November 18th, 2022

Michael Rogers revealed the non-profits Dorsey Alston, Realtors is supporting in honor of our 75th anniversary, donating $45,000 to support Alzheimer’s research and families struggling with ALS, disabilities, special needs, poverty and medical emergencies. Earlier this year, we asked agents and staff to submit charities they are connected to and strongly support. The selected organizations would receive grants in recognition of the company’s milestone.

November 16th, 2022

Dorsey Alston reviews FMLS data monthly to understand what is happening in the market. We are seeing a slowdown in sales and new listings, which is seasonal. The market is also being impacted by rising interest rates and an overall lack of inventory — but well-priced houses are still selling and getting multiple offers. 

October 17th, 2022

In September, houses were closing for prices 13% higher compared to last year across the six markets Dorsey Alston Realtors tracks closely, while the number of new listings fell 19% and the overall number of sales dropped 35%. 

The broader 11-county metro Atlanta area reflects the trends. Sales are down, as are new listings, and prices are up over the same period. New listings in September totaled 7,407, a 5.3% decrease from August and a 6% decrease from last September, while active listings jumped 6.7% month over month and 33% year over year to 13,999.

September 20th, 2022

Inventory key as markets return to seasonal norms. Atlanta remains a seller’s market with a two-month supply of available houses. Interest rates are inching up, price appreciation has settled down a bit and overall the market is returning to more normal seasonal changes. Traditionally, house prices peak in June, with August marking a slowdown with summer vacations and school calendars picking up. After Labor Day, things traditionally start moving again. That is what Dorsey Alston, Realtors is seeing.

August 22nd, 2022

The housing market is starting to adapt. For the first time in two years, inventory is catching up slightly with demand. Through the pandemic, metro Atlanta had a one-month supply of houses on the market. Last month, the supply jumped to two months. Buyers are finally starting to feel like they have some leverage.